Michelangelo Logo
MICHELANGELO
New technology to help children with Autism

News

Oxytocin activates 'social' brain regions in children with autism

Researchers from Yale University have found that while engaging with social information, children with autism spectrum disorders experienced enhanced brain activity after a single dose of the hormone oxytocin was administered through a nasal spray.

Read more: Oxytocin activates 'social' brain regions in children with autism

'Wellbeing improved' if children with autism recruit imaginary helpers

Thursday, January 9

Researchers believe they have developed a psychological technique that improves the mental wellbeing of children with autism - through an activity that invents tiny characters the kids can then imagine are in their heads helping them out with their thoughts.

Read more: 'Wellbeing improved' if children with autism recruit imaginary helpers

MICHELANGELO project in the reseach*eu magazine

The April issue of research*eu  RESULTS MAGAZINE has been devoted to «Science by and for the young».

The MICHELANGELO project  is among the 11 projects selected to document the European initiatives of the FP7 Program focusing on the needs, problems and day-to-day reality of young people. 

The magazine reports an interview to Silvio Bonfiglio, MICHELANGELO Project’s Coordinator.

Read more: MICHELANGELO project in the reseach*eu magazine

Enhanced ability to make new connections retained in some brain regions

Thursday, January 9

In adults, some brain regions retain a "childlike" ability to establish new connections, potentially contributing to our ability to learn new skills and form new memories as we age, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle.

Read more: Enhanced ability to make new connections retained in some brain regions

Autism brains are overly connected, studies find

Three studies published over the past two months have found significant evidence that children and adolescents with autism have brains that are overly connected compared with the brains of controls. The findings complicate the theory that autism is fundamentally characterized by weakly connected brain regions.

Read more: Autism brains are overly connected, studies find

top top
Copyright © 2012 - 2014 Michelangelo Project - Helping Children with Autism
The Michelangelo Project is co-funded from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° #288241