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Worms and hot baths: Novel approaches to treating autism

Tuesday, December 17

A new study shows that two unusual treatment approaches may have beneficial effects on the symptoms of autism in children and adults with the disorder. Using a hot bath to raise body temperature and thereby mimic the effects of infection, or using worm eggs to stimulate the production of immunoregulatory factors in the gut to diminish inflammatory signals, both attenuated symptoms of autism.

Read more: Worms and hot baths: Novel approaches to treating autism

Key protein identified that is responsible for controlling communication between brain cells

Monday, December 2

Scientists are a step closer to understanding how some of the brain's 100 billion nerve cells co-ordinate their communication. The study is published in the journal Cell Reports. 

Read more: Key protein identified that is responsible for controlling communication between brain cells

Autism-like behaviors in mice alleviated by probiotic therapy

Tuesday, December 10

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed when individuals exhibit characteristic behaviors that include repetitive actions, decreased social interactions, and impaired communication. Curiously, many individuals with ASD also suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) issues, such as abdominal cramps and constipation.

Read more: Autism-like behaviors in mice alleviated by probiotic therapy

Brain function in children with autism improved by a single spray of oxytocin

Tuesday, December 3

A single dose of the hormone oxytocin, delivered via nasal spray, has been shown to enhance brain activity while processing social information in children with autism spectrum disorders, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read more: Brain function in children with autism improved by a single spray of oxytocin

Children Who Have Autism Far More Likely to Have Tummy Troubles

Nov. 6, 2013

Children with autism experience gastrointestinal (GI) upsets such as constipation, diarrhea and sensitivity to foods six-to-eight times more often than do children who are developing typically, and those symptoms are related to behavioral problems, including social withdrawal, irritability and repetitive behaviors, a new study by researchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute has found.

Read more: Children Who Have Autism Far More Likely to Have Tummy Troubles

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The Michelangelo Project is co-funded from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° #288241